Author Topic: nursing of the future  (Read 105 times)

nursesue

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nursing of the future
« on: September 28, 2018, 06:43:44 PM »
winter is getting nearer those dark cold nights and for those of us in GP land it signifies flu season and the start of the flu immunisation campaign. I attended the immunisation update seminar and whilst waiting for the lift I overheard an intriguing conversation between 2 nurses "there are no nurses because there are too many doing Drs work and becoming nurse specialists" Our role as GP Practice nurses is undergoing a wee bit of a change as less Drs choose to work in primary care so time for the powers that be to "upgrade" us or change our roles.
We have lost our baby immunisation clinics to a specialist immunisation team and plans are afoot to create hubs so that patients can attend for venepuncture  thereby free up nursing time to undertake more chronic disease clinics and free up GP time.
Some surgeries have Paramedics who do house calls and take on emergency appointments
I am now too old in the tooth to undertake a nurse practitioner or do a nurse prescribing course but I am more than happy to give good quality nursing care.
As one GP says I'll sit in my office and be like a band leader conducting my troops and wave my baton around conducting you all...
So, for those of us who are still practicing- are you roles changing and  if so - for the better or the worse??
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-6218167/Fears-NHS-catastrophe-2-5-MILLION-patients-GP-surgeries-disappear.html
« Last Edit: September 28, 2018, 08:38:24 PM by wilfb »

myk1066

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Re: nursing of the future
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2018, 10:26:07 PM »
Sue, your never too old!  Non Medical Prescribing is a 6 month course, quite labour intensive but well worth undertaking.  Iím an ANP, previously an Emergency Nurse Practitioner, and took up role just over a year ago.  I work in a nurse led unit, with a Nurse Consultant.  To work autonomously dealing with my patients from beginning to end is immensely rewarding.  Iím a doctor on the cheap and none of us in the NHS get paid our worth.  Iím sure, correct me if Iím wrong, your GP gets paid for the services you carry out on their behalf, they reap the rewards for your work.  When I undertook my MSc there were enough of us, with relevant skills to start a primary care service that would have been second to non, had we had the balls to do it, so to speak.  I know the WiC, co located, pay their ANPís very well, but they want blood out of a stone and work them hard for their pay.  Iíve also known nurses qualify in their 50ís, so age proves it can be done.  I agree that we are becoming specialist but there are still nurses who want to nurse, I work with nurses in their 70ís!  There will always be those nurses who are happy be just nurses and I would encourage that but also encourage role expansion.  We as nurses are a force to be reckoned with.

wilfb

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Re: nursing of the future
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2018, 07:34:41 PM »
Hi Sue,

I'm a bit too long in the tooth for this discussion to matter to me personally, but Myk has a point worth making.  When I was a Senior tutor I was part of a panel that appointed more than one nursing student to training who was over 50!  All subsequently qualified - but I do know what you mean and I would not want the hassle now...

Will.

ahashton

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Re: nursing of the future
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2018, 01:12:24 PM »
I read an interesting  article this week which including starting salaries for professionals:

Teachers abt £22k p.a.
Nurses    abt £22K p.a.
our M.P.s abt £66K p.a.

All of these salaries are of course met by the tax payer.
I am appalled by the lack of good conditions  to which some nurses are subjected - lack of dining facilities for night staff - expected to  provide their own food -  no rest rooms for meal breaks  -  expected  to pay to park their cars when working anti social hospital hours  -  the list is endless, whereas others in government at both local and national level, as well as some managers,  see fit to work office hours, provide themselves  with subsidised meals, free parking etc.  If we are looking  to provide a good standard of nursing care in the future, greater consideration needs to be given to nurses value to society, reward well trained and qualified nurses according; This may be an old argument but I suggest there is room for some adjustment of remuneration between the worthy and the less worthy.   We can then expect high standards throughout the profession in return! 

nursesue

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Re: nursing of the future
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2018, 06:46:18 PM »
I am busy planning my retirement in about 2 and half years time & I am a wee bit fed up with the way all Governments treat us and a minority of the public I'm not sure if its worth me undertaking me any more study intensive courses for very little reward while the job I love is slowly eroding away - so yes its time to hang up my uniform and take a part time job doing something else.
Mike you are right GPs are paid for by the number of targets we meet albeit it has changed over the last year or so no QOF just cluster!!!

wilfb

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Re: nursing of the future
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2018, 08:27:02 PM »
Hi.

Stay with it a bit longer Sue.  I quite like 'ahastons' contribution!  Maybe the great leveller will return and start paying the worthy (workers) worthy salaries and letting managers work night shifts....

Will.